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Old 03-06-2016, 06:51 PM   #1
doggonit55
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New phase change build

I am working on a used LD PC-V10 Reverse Computer case with Integrated Phase Change. So far have sprayed motherboard with conformal coating, and trying out something different instead of eraser. Good luck so far. Stay tuned for details.
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Old 03-07-2016, 06:22 AM   #2
iczerjones
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Pricey piece of kit, but can't wait to see it in action.
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Old 03-07-2016, 03:09 PM   #3
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Purchased used on eBay. Still not cheap, but didn't sting as much. I have pictures of what has been done so far, but now in the middle of a job change, and not much time to reduce the pic's to fit on this forum.
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Old 03-07-2016, 04:02 PM   #4
doggonit55
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Ready to start. I am having trouble reducing pics. Sorry about the slow progress of this posting.
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Old 03-07-2016, 05:40 PM   #5
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Not necessarily in order. Motherboard was new, so I did not really bother with cleaning it. See link for conformal spray (TECHSPRAY 2102-12S Silicone Conformal Coating). By the time everything was masked, is seemed a very large percentage of the board was not going to be sprayed. At least on the front. The back and front were given 2 liberal coats of spray.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...9SIA5D52PR4495
I allowed this to dry. I then used Dow Corning 4 Electrical Insulating Compound to fill the CPU socket. I spent a long time trying to research this, as I was less than thrilled to experiment with the CPU socket on such an expensive motherboard. It seems some people complain about Vaseline having a low melting point and running out of the socket to some extent. This has very good thermal properties. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ilpage_o03_s00
I even tried melting a mound of it with my solder heat gun, and it maintained it's shape. It is working flawlessly after 2 weeks. First boot was successful. I was concerned some of the CPU pins might be forced out of contact, but that does not seem to be an issue. Next up will be what I tried in place of art eraser to protect from condensation.
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Old 03-07-2016, 06:39 PM   #6
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I was concerned about the long term use of art eraser around the CPU socket, and looked for a moldable silicone rubber, and found this.
Polly Plastics Silicone Molding Putty - 1/2 Lb http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01...ilpage_o00_s00
I cleaned the excess silicone dielectric grease from around the socket, and then mixed the silicone putty and worked it in place. I don't know that it looks any better than the eraser, but there is a liquid form of this that I suspect would pour in nicely and not dry with the fingerprints like this does. I am very happy with how this turned out. I did put a thin film of silicone dielectric grease around the edges in case the rubber edges lift from the board over time. On the back of the board I used closed cell foam rubber. I found some that was slightly thicker than the height of the motherboard mounting standoffs, and it is now compressed under the motherboard. I also used a small amount of dielectric grease under the outside edges of the rubber. I now have this torn down waiting for new mounting screws for the cooling block, as I do not like the way these look.
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Old 03-07-2016, 06:50 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doggonit55 View Post
I was concerned about the long term use of art eraser around the CPU socket, and looked for a moldable silicone rubber, and found this.
Polly Plastics Silicone Molding Putty - 1/2 Lb http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01...ilpage_o00_s00
Interesting stuff. Is it removable?, and how clean?
Eraser lasts quite a long time. I have some benching boards that were prepped years ago that I only have to touch up when I change processors. I've never had an issue.
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Old 03-07-2016, 07:11 PM   #8
doggonit55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Scott View Post
Interesting stuff. Is it removable?, and how clean?
Eraser lasts quite a long time. I have some benching boards that were prepped years ago that I only have to touch up when I change processors. I've never had an issue.
Very clean though oily when first mixed. That goes away. Easy to clean as it is silicone rubber. I suspect the dust collector will be the edges that I sealed with silicone dielectric. Would be better to use a silicone adhesive I suppose. I have not tried to remove the rubber, but am certain it will come off if needed. I was able to remove some where it was not supposed to be. The conformal coating can be removed by solvent sold by the same company. In all honesty, I didn't like the art eraser because of the fingerprints. This was not much better. It does seem to be very tough, and seems to insulate well enough I don't need the black insulating foam. I wish I had tried the liquid form. Perhaps someone else is would like to. SmoothOn Moldstar 15 Slow Molding silicone. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ilpage_o04_s00

Update 09/17/17 The silicone holds up extremely well, and has stayed tight to the board from what I can tell. There is some frost formation on the surface, so need to keep that in mind. I don't know if rubber eraser insulates better or not. Perhaps sandwich a thin layer of closed cell foam between two thinner applications of this silicone. I would like to see someone use liquid rubber.

Update 09/19/16 I cannot recommend this material, at least as applied. Please see later posts. There was moisture under the silicone rubber.
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Old 03-12-2016, 12:36 PM   #9
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lots of views, but no comments. Feel free to leave positive or negative comments. Any feedback can potentially be helpful for new ideas. the reason for the presentation of this build is to help stimulate a rather slow to nearly dead section of these forums.
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Old 03-12-2016, 01:26 PM   #10
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I'm still watching.
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Old 03-12-2016, 06:24 PM   #11
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OK. Today I'm replacing the cooling head mounting hardware so it looks a little better. Also added spring tensioners. Theoretically they will help maintain constant tension through heating and cooling cycles, though I have no evidence to support that. I have disassembled the first video card, washed it down with solvent to get the sticky stuff off. I don't know how the stock heat sink can work all that well, as the tape interface was very thick. The copper heat sinks have been placed, and conformal coating applied. That will probably take all day to dry. I will be using a Koolance EXC-800 chiller to cool the GPUs on both cards. I think it will be enough after seeing how the stock cooler was set up. We will see. I haven't decided how to insulate the back of the GPU's yet. I would like to use the closed cell foam, but keeping it attached (and make it look good) is what I haven't figured out yet. For the front I will probably use the silicone putty again. And yes, it's a ton of copper on that card.
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Old 03-12-2016, 06:34 PM   #12
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Fabricate a backplate and use the foam between that and the card. You'll still need some air across the cards to cool the VRM's.
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Old 03-12-2016, 06:47 PM   #13
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Thanks. That may be the solution. As far as airflow, I have some of those external cooling fan brackets.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/251710287692
http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Fans-Mount...-/251879093930
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Old 03-12-2016, 07:09 PM   #14
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Right on.
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Old 03-13-2016, 02:45 PM   #15
doggonit55
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Card came with a back plate. No place in town to buy M2 nuts to make it work. Now that I am at home typing this, I have the idea of looking at the hobby stores. Some of those RC racers and robot things probably use them. I don't keep anything smaller than M4, but I already have an assortment coming. I think on the front of the card I will use the silicone putty around the GPU, and on the back will try some of the pour on silicone liquid. It should flow up under the back plate enough to both seal it and keep it in place. I have a pile of art eraser, but really want to try this to see how it works.
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Old 04-04-2016, 08:38 PM   #16
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Decided to use closed cell foam insulation on the back. Very easy to do by sandwiching it between the board and the back plate. Under the cooling blocks, used Grizzly heat sink compound, and a bed of silicone dielectric in the recess around the circuit board that surrounds the polished contact point. I tried to mask off the area around the cooling blocks, but too difficult to do without a ridiculous amount of work, so used the silicone putty again instead of the pour in kind. It worked well. Maybe encase the cooling blocks with the pour in silicone?
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Old 04-21-2016, 08:09 PM   #17
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2nd video card

Second video card disassembled. Again noted how thick the heat sink material under the back plate is, and wondering how it can function very well. It seems to be very greasy, so maybe the composition allows heat transfer to be better than my first impression.
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Old 04-21-2016, 08:26 PM   #18
doggonit55
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Washed down the motherboard using TECHSPRAY 1620-10S Blue Shower Maintenance Cleaner. There is some light film left on the board that can be cleaned off with a brush. I use an ESD safe brush that looks like a toothbrush. Next was Enzotech copper heat sinks, then the conformal coating. I have found Zoro to be a reasonable source for the cleaner and conformal coating, due to free shipping for $50.00 order. I used a shorter copper heat sink where the outlet fittings will be for the water blocks. Be sure the blocks face away from the PCI-E motherboard connector. That is a very easy mistake. I went with EK-VGA Supremacy - Acetal. I am hoping the acetal will have less tendency to sweat.
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Last edited by doggonit55; 04-21-2016 at 09:13 PM. Reason: sequence of assembly was incorrect
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Old 04-21-2016, 08:44 PM   #19
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Next, applied the Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut Thermal Grease Paste - 11.1 Grams Model TG-K-015-R. I think this stuff is approaching the price of cheap gold, but supposed to be good stuff. The small tube has only enough for one processor, so be careful. This tube has plenty at 11.1 grams. I keep the sealed tube in the supplied Ziploc bag. I have had heat sink compound start to dry out with age. I then applied a thin layer of silicone dielectric grease around the border. Refer to the previous video card for the finished product. both cards look the same. I am just giving more detail here.
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Old 05-01-2016, 11:24 AM   #20
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Was that a specific heatsink kit for your card or did you make some of those? Cutting ramsinks sucks to do.
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